Date of Award

7-25-2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Educational and School Psychology

First Advisor

Joseph F. Kovaleski, D. Ed.

Second Advisor

Christoph Maier, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Lynanne Black, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Edward M. Levinson, Ph.D.

Abstract

Transition planning is an essential part of the education of students with disabilities. The school psychologist has the opportunity to contribute to the success of transition planning outcomes. A review of the professional literature indicates that there is infrequent emphasis placed on the contribution of the school psychologist in the transition planning process and there is little in the professional literature to indicate how school psychologists are being trained or to what extent they typically participate in the post-secondary transition process. This study examines the amount and type of transition training that school psychology students are currently receiving, as well as the relationships between the characteristics of the training programs and the amount of transition training that takes place. This qualitative study addresses the question, "What types and intensities of training in the area of transition are current students of NASP-approved programs receiving?" Overall, analysis indicated that programs with a greater number of full-time faculty were not found to offer a significantly greater amount of training in the area of transition. Programs with a greater number of full-time faculty who were also certified school psychologists were found to offer a slightly higher, but non-significant amount of training in the area of transition. Programs that offered a doctoral credential were not found to offer a significantly greater amount of training in the area of transition than were programs that offer a specialist only credential. Correlations indicated positive but non-significant relationships among these variables. The data collected in this study suggest that little training is occurring specifically in the area of transition training. As only NASP-approved training programs were included in this study, the results of this study may not generalize completely to those school psychology programs that do not have NASP-accreditation. Future research should include methods to assess the reliability and validity of the results, could expand the number of programs included in the survey, involve school psychology training programs that are not NASP-accredited, and include surveying students and program directors about the perceived needs of school psychologists, and how these needs may be have been better met in their training.

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