Date of Award

8-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health and Physical Education

First Advisor

Elaine A. Blair, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Madeline Paternostro Bayles, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Robert E. Alman II, D.Ed.

Fourth Advisor

John A. Mills, Ph.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of lifestyle intervention program on exercise adherence and physical activity behavior in members of a university-based fitness center. In an experimental study design, 32 apparently healthy adults were randomized to either a lifestyle intervention (LI) group or a personal training only (PT) group. Both groups received eight weeks of personal training, but LI received additional behavioral and cognitive strategies. Statistical analyses compared between and within group differences using independent and paired samples t-tests. Results indicated that LI significantly improved exercise adherence (p = 0.029) and self-efficacy (p = 0.025) compared to PT. Future research is recommended to examine the efficacy of using a lifestyle intervention program within an Exercise Science curriculum. For future consideration, health/fitness professionals should be aware of additional behavioral strategies to help clients improve exercise adherence and self-efficacy, two important components to maintaining healthy lifestyle behaviors.

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