Date of Award

12-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Foreign Languages

First Advisor

Frank B. Brooks, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Eileen W. Glisan, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Marjorie Zambrano-Paff, Ph.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this replication study was to investigate how students' turns at talk and discussion during selected whole-group text-focused speaking activity in an advanced undergraduate Conversation class in Spanish met the stated goal of the course (the development of speaking skills at Advanced-Low oral proficiency standard, as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines). Using a discourse analytical framework, the transcripts were analyzed for (1) teacher question types; (2) length of student and instructor talk and (3) the verb tenses used in students responses. The results showed that, for the most part, students' turns at talk were at the Novice and Intermediate levels, or below the Advanced-low level due to the types of questions posed by the teacher, which led the student to produce one-word, phrase, or one to two sentences per utterance, mostly in the simple present tense. Implications for language teaching and recommendations for further investigations are provided.

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