Date of Award

5-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Sarah Neusius, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Benjamin Ford, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Beverly Chiarulli, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Susan Prezzano, Ph.D.

Abstract

The archaeological record provided evidence of the widespread exploitation of fish in prehistoric Eastern North America, but the amount and quality of evidence for fishing technology is limited. Although nonperishable items such as netsinkers and fishhooks may be common, there are few intact examples of nets that were widely used in the process of fishing. Remaining examples of prehistoric netting in Eastern North America were constructed of cordage, although there are representations of differing construction methods that resulted in a multitude of final products through materials, types, sizes. One potential way of understanding the range of netting technologies utilized in the Middle Atlantic region is to examine impressions left on identified net impressed pottery and replicate these technologies. The Delaware River provides an excellent opportunity because of its history of fish-based subsistence and the presence of net marked ceramic wares, for researchers to solidify their understanding of prehistoric netting technology.

Share

COinS