Date of Award

12-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Professional Studies in Education

First Advisor

Joseph F. Marcoline, Ed.D.

Second Advisor

Meghan Twiest, Ed.D.

Third Advisor

Kelli Reefer Paquette, Ed.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine if a relationship between college freshmen’s perceptions of school climate and instances of high school bullying existed. The college freshmen that participated in this study completed an on-line survey that asked them to reflect upon grades 9 through 12 of their high school experiences, particularly how they described the climate of their high schools, and related instances of bullying. Additionally, this research was used to find the appropriate methods to cultivate a student-centered climate where all students feel connected and safe in an environment where bullying is not tolerated. The researcher addressed these issues by providing the results from this study and recommendations to improve school climate and anti-bullying policies. Findings from this study found a correlation between school climate and instances of bullying stating that students that perceived their climate as positive had less incidences of bullying. In addition, there was also a significant difference between gender and school climate.

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