Date of Award

5-8-2012

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Criminology

First Advisor

Jennifer J. Roberts, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Alida V. Merlo, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Kathleen J. Hanrahan, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Erika Davis Frenzel, Ph.D.

Abstract

The instant research is intended as a response to the growing public and political concerns for Latino (primarily Mexican) immigration, and fear of a Latino “crime problem”. Despite concerns over this perceived problem, previous studies have consistently shown that a linkage between immigration and crime is not supported by the data (Martinez & Lee, 2000). Still, researchers have argued that Latino crime is a phenomenon that warrants continued examination—especially since there appears to be some kind of relationship between acculturation and criminal behavior among this ethnic group. The primary research question asks: “To what extent do Latinos support the use of violence, and does this change depending on their level of acculturation?” Through the use of an internet-based survey, the researcher measured socio-demographic characteristics, level of acculturation, and cultural attitudes (norms) toward violence.

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