Date of Award

12-1-2006

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Professional Studies in Education

First Advisor

Wenfan Yan, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Cathy Kaufman, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Robert E. Millward, D.Ed.

Abstract

The purpose of this descriptive case study was to understand the impact on librarians, faculty, and students of changes in information literacy instructional methodologies that were piloted as an innovation within a particular institutional setting. The following questions were considered. In what ways and to what extent has a more holistic approach to teaching information literacy been assimilated by faculty and librarians? In what ways and to what extent have faculty attitudes toward teaching information literacy skills been affected by the introduction of these holistic instructional approaches? In what ways and to what extent have librarian relationships with faculty changed as a result of these holistic approaches to teaching information literacy? In what ways and to what extent are student learning outcomes affected by the introduction of a more holistic approach to teaching information literacy? Focus group interviews were conducted with librarians and faculty participants of the holistic instructional model to determine the extent to which assimilation had occurred, and to explore changes in faculty attitudes toward teaching information literacy and in faculty relationships with librarians. The focus group questions were based upon the Stages of Concern (SoC) Questionnaire (Hall & Hord, 2001). To understand the impact of the instructional model upon student learning outcomes, paired samples t tests and analyses of variance were conducted on information literacy knowledge pretest and posttest scores reported during the time that the holistic model was introduced. The findings of this study indicated that assimilation of the holistic model of information literacy instruction at the study site was affected by factors such as scope of responsibility for instruction, degree of support, and impact of the rate of change on work load. Faculty attitudes toward teaching information literacy components as part of their own courses changed in a positive way, mainly because the model provided them opportunities for development and support. Librarian and faculty relationships improved as a result of the collaborative teaching models employed as components of holistic information literacy instruction. Finally, student learning outcomes were affected positively by an approach to teaching information literacy that includes first-year as well as upper-level instruction.

Share

COinS