Date of Award

7-16-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

English

First Advisor

Gian S. Pagnucci, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Bennett A. Rafoth, Ed.D.

Third Advisor

Michael M. Williamson, Ph.D.

Abstract

This systematic review and meta-analysis study, using dynamic discipline analysis and metaphor analysis, reviews nonfiction fan compositions produced within the Harry Potter fandom to survey the disciplinary affiliations claimed by writers, the discursive strategies employed by writers, and the intertextual citations and references made by writers. A total of 2,063 nonfiction fan compositions, or HP Fancomps, were identified, of which 660 engaged in diegetic disciplinary analysis. These 660 texts represented ten disciplines, and a sample set of 50 HP Fancomps were collected and analyzed. Data show that nearly all selected texts do engage in rigorous academic writing, nearly all selected texts do participate in recognizable disciplinary genre conventions, and most selected texts use Harry Potter as the vehicle of the metaphor. Furthermore, the writers of these texts are for the most part professional academics: many hold doctorates or other terminal degrees and most are affiliated with respected academic institutions. Writers of HP Fancomps emerge from various disciplines, engage in legitimate scholarship that makes real and important contributions to the larger scholarly community, and interrogate diegetic and hyperdiegetic questions with scholarly authority. Encouraging students in their composition of fancomps can enrich our teaching of disciplinarity, strengthen students' legitimacy as novice scholars, and position students in a place of authority in relation to their data set.

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