Date of Award

6-20-2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Professional Studies in Education

First Advisor

George R. Bieger, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Monte Tidwell, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Larry A. Vold, Ph.D.

Abstract

This study uses quantitative and qualitative designs to examine if motivations for choosing a teaching career influence the intention to teach or not to teach in urban settings, and if a short-term urban field experience has significant impact on the change in the motivations as well as the intention to teach in urban settings. Overall, pre-service teachers in the study chose a teaching career due to the influence of such factors as beliefs of teaching ability, intrinsic, social, and personal values of teaching, perception of teaching, prior learning and teaching experiences, and social influence. Among these factors, teaching ability, social value, and perception of teaching were significantly correlated with the intention to teach in urban settings, though the relationships were relatively weak. Intrinsic value, however, had no significant correlation with the intention to teach in urban settings. Quantitative data analyses indicated that the short-term urban field experience had a significant impact on both the entry motivations for teaching and the intention to teach in urban settings. The qualitative data, however, showed mixed results, suggesting that the relationships between motivation factors, the choice of a teaching career, and the intention to teach in urban settings, were more complicated than they appeared to be.

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