Date of Award

2-4-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Educational and School Psychology

First Advisor

Joseph F. Kovaleski, D.Ed.

Second Advisor

Lynanne Black, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Christoph E. Maier, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Alexander V. Tabori, Ph.D.

Abstract

The current study utilized a correlational and quasi-experimental design to expand on prior research regarding the relationship between the implementation of core components of Response to Intervention (RTI) and the reading achievement of elementary students. In addition, the effects of RTI sustainability on reading achievement were studied by analyzing the relationship between the length of time the core components were implemented and gains in school reading achievement. Furthermore, the effects of principal longevity on the implementation of RTI and school reading achievement were investigated. Results were non-significant for an association between gains in school reading achievement and the core component utilization of universal screening, research-based reading series, data-analysis teams, multi-tiered systems of support, fidelity measures for core instruction, fidelity measures for supplemental reading intervention, and progress monitoring. Results were also non-significant for an association between reading achievement growth and the core component implementation period of universal screening, data-analysis teams, progress monitoring, fidelity measures for core reading instruction, fidelity measures for supplemental reading instruction, and the implementation of a reading series (regardless of its research base). There was a positive association found between the length of time multi-tiered systems of support were implemented and school reading achievement growth. Finally, principal longevity was not shown to be associated with gains in school reading achievement or level of RTI implementation. A discussion of the findings, including limitations of the study and implications for future research, current practice, and the field of school psychology are described in the final chapter.

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