Date of Award

6-8-2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Criminology

First Advisor

Dennis M. Giever, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Jennifer J. Roberts, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Daniel R. Lee, Ph.D.

Fourth Advisor

Christoph E. Maier, Ph.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation was to develop three theoretical models of crimereporting behavior. One objective of this dissertation was to determine the effect of a number of crime-reporting predictors on people’s willingness to report crimes to the police. Such predictors included police behavior, attitudes toward the police, individuals’ demographic characteristics, prior victimization, citizen interaction with the police, and crime-reporting anonymity. The findings of this research study are based on the analyses of the data that were collected through a self-administered survey questionnaire distributed to 531 undergraduate students during the beginning of the fall 2009 semester. The results that emerged in the current study show that crime-reporting behavior varies by the severity and the consequences of crimes. This study suggests that certain crime-reporting predictors do not predict all three crime-reporting levels, namely reporting of less serious crimes (e.g., smoking marijuana, selling illicit drugs, painting graffiti, etc.), reporting of medium-level crimes (e.g., physical threats, future terroristic threats, etc), and reporting of serious crimes (e.g., kidnapping, rape, murder, etc.). The findings of the current study show that gender, race, citizen interaction with the police, police behavior, attitudes toward the police, and fear of criminal retaliation are the most reliable crime-reporting predictors.

Share

COinS