Date of Award

Fall 12-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ded)

Department

Professional Studies in Education

First Advisor

Mark McGowan, Ph.D.

Second Advisor

Timothy Runge, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Joseph F. Kovaleski, D.Ed.

Fourth Advisor

Mark J. Staszkiewicz, Ed.D.

Abstract

This meta-analysis examined the efficacy of CASEL SELect programs when used with minority students from high-poverty communities. Based on a review of the literature, prior evidence provided support for the efficacy of these programs (Conduct Problems Research Group, 1999; Domitrovich, Cortes, & Greenberg, 2007; Reid et al., 2007). The Hedges and Olkin meta-analytic approach was used for the current study (Johnson, Mullen, & Salas, 1995). Findings from the meta-analysis supported three of the four research hypotheses. In particular, SEL programs yielded significant positive effects on targeted outcomes when used with minority students from high-poverty communities. SEL programs increased prosocial behaviors, reduced conduct problems as well as emotional distress, and improved academic performance. Findings from this meta-analysis built on prior results from the Durlak et al. (2011) meta-analysis. School districts may begin to identify, select, and use high-quality and evidence-based SEL programs with minority students from high-poverty communities. One of the study's major limitations was that it was restricted to only select studies from elementary and middle schools. An important next step will be to disseminate findings of CASEL SELect programs that had positive effectiveness ratings with minority students from high-poverty communities.

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