Date of Award

12-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Communications Media

First Advisor

Mark Piwinsky

Second Advisor

Mary Beth Leidman

Third Advisor

Zachary Stiegler

Fourth Advisor

Jay Start

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between social media use and cross-cultural competency among employees in who possess different job positions in multicultural companies in Saudi Arabia. Informed by Social Capital Theory and Uncertainty Reduction Theory, this study used a quantitative method to explore the role of social media in fostering employees’ cross-cultural competency. A survey was snowballed to collect the data and resulted in a sample that was predominately Arabic males. For this sample, the study examined seven hypotheses: Three were found to be significant - the difference in the level of cross-cultural competency based on the level of interaction with global content on social media, job position, and job position combined with time spent on social media. Most noteworthy is that contrary to the literature, managers scored lower on cross-cultural competency than non-managers. The remaining four hypotheses were not significant - the difference in the level of cross-cultural competency based on the time spent on social media, time spent and interaction with global content, job position combined with interaction with global content, and the interaction of job position, time spent and global content with cross-cultural competency.

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